Nature’s patterns

 

 

Taiwan 2014
Taiwan 2014d
The native area of beach almond (Terminalia catappa), also known as country almond, Indian almond, Talisay tree, and umbrella tree, is unknown. Today, this species is widely distributed in most tropical and some subtropical areas of the world, growing in a wide range of habitats. Three of its popular names stem from the similarity of its fruits to those of the true almond (Prunus amygdalus), but the two species are not at all related, the true almond belonging to the rose family (Rosaceae), while beach almond belongs to the family Combretaceae. In Taiwan, where these pictures were taken, it is widely planted as an ornamental tree. The upper picture shows a bright red winter leaf, and in the lower picture, leaves have been partly eaten by insects. Another picture of this species is found on this website, see: In praise of the colour red. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013b
Californien 2013b
This acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) has chiseled its nesting hole in the trunk of a palm tree, and around the nesting hole, it has made numerous small holes for storage of acorns as a winter supply. – Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve, California, United States. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan_2017b_256
The nerves on these leaves of the parasol-leaf tree (Macaranga tanarius) create beautiful patterns against the light. This species, which is also called heart leaf or nasturtium tree, belongs to the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). It is a native of eastern China, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, the Philippines, New Guinea, and eastern Australia. It is very common in Taiwan, where this picture was taken. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kirgisien 1999
Horse riders in a snow-covered landscape, Arashan Valley, Kyrgyzstan. – Read about horses on this website, see Animals: Animals as servants of Man – Horse, donkey and mule. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica
Agave leaf, still not fully opened, Parque Nacional Rincon de la Vieja, Cordillera de Guanacaste, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018b
Plantation of betel palms (Areca catechu), Taiwan. This species is grown by the millions in this island, where every other man chews betel, a mild intoxicant, consisting of a leaf from the betel bush (Piper betle), which is wrapped around bits of betel palm nut, lime, and, according to your taste, tobacco or spices. Chewing this mixture increases your spit production, and red blotches of betel spit is ubiquitous in Taiwan, and in many other parts of South and Southeast Asia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Arizona-Utah 2001
Monstrous growth of a saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona, United States. Cristate, or crested, saguaros form, when the cells in the growing stem begin to divide outward, rather than in the circular pattern of a normal cactus. This mutation results in the growth of a large fan-shaped crest at the growing tip of a saguaro’s main stem or ‘arms’. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Banana leaf, torn by the wind, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 1998-99 
This young ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis) has just landed in a creek, creating concentric circles on the surface, Long Island, United States. This medium-sized gull has a very wide distribution, found across North America, from the northern prairie states of Canada, south to northern California and the U.S. prairie states, and eastwards to Newfoundland. It winters in the U.S., Mexico, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. The specific name delawarensis refers to the Delaware River, where it was first collected. It was described by American naturalist George Ord (1781-1866), who, incidentally, also described several specimens, brought back by the Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806), e.g. black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus), grizzly bear (Ursus arctos ssp. horribilis), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). – Read more about this expedition on this website, see Animals: Squirrels of North America. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Alperne 2017
Fallen inflorescences of edible chestnut (Castanea sativa) at a roadside, Bühlertal, Schwarzwald, Germany. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2017b
Hair pattern on the rump of a Taiwanese dog, also called Takasago dog. – Read about dogs on this website, see Animals: Animals as servants of Man. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2016-18 
Detail of a weather-beaten beam in a house, which was formerly used as storage hut for harvested flax (Linum usitatissimum), Lerkaka, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kirgisien 1999
Glacier with patterns, created by deposited moraine, Yrdyk Valley, Kyrgyzstan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

LFM 1987-2016
Wood horsetails (Equisetum sylvaticum) in a dark forest, illuminated by a patch of sunshine, Møn, Denmark. This attractive horsetail, which resembles a tiny spruce tree, is distributed in the northern temperate and arctic zones of Eurasia and North America. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Annapurna 2007 
Mustang is a very dry area in central Nepal, which, however, receives enough precipitation to create gullies in a bluff along the Jhong Khola River. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 2012-16
Fyn 2005-09
Close-up of common goat’s-beard (Tragopogon pratensis) seeds, Denmark. This species is native to Europe and northern Asia, and has also become widely naturalized in North America. The sepal-like bracts, which surround the flowerhead, contract before noon, closing it, which has given rise to a popular name of the plant, Jack-go-to-bed-by-noon. When the plant has seeds, these protrude from the flowerhead during the contraction, hereby resembling a goat’s beard. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali 2009
Leaves of a tree fern, seen from below, Bedugul Botanical Garden, Bali, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 2013-15
Brightly coloured buildings, reflected in Lake Birksø, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Malaysia 1984-85
Pattern, created by a small crab, which has deposited sand balls, brought up from its hole on a sandy beach, Pulau Gaya, Sabah, Borneo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2003-05 
Eroded Nanya Sandstone with layers of oxidized iron, northern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tunesien 1987
Stems of chopped-off leaves create a pattern on the trunk of a date palm (Phoenix dactylifera), Nefta, Tunisia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013 
Bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), washed up on a stony beach, Salt Point State Park, California, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Cambodia 2010
View from Phnom Krom Hill, Siem Reap, Cambodia: Impressions of ox-cart wheels make patterns in fallow paddy fields. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Guatemala 1998
Palm leaf, Tikal National Park, Guatemala. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2012 
Plant, clinging to a stone wall, Lion’s Head National Scenic Area, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica
Small gullies on a sandy beach, created by receding water at low tide, Parque Nacional Corcovado, Peninsula de Osa, Costa Rica. – Read more about Parque Nacional Corcovado on this website, see Travel episodes: Costa Rica 2012 – Coastal hike to Corcovado. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2016 
The shadow from a coniferous tree is cast on a barn, Portland, Maine, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 2013-15
Ripples on a lake surface create wavy patterns in reflections of common club-rush (Schoenoplectus lacustris) and broad-leaved pondweed (Potamogeton natans), Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 1987 
Fallow terraced fields, Pokhara, Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 2012-16
Stacked trunks of Norway spruce (Picea abies), Zealand, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydlige Afrika 1996-97 
A pair of African black duck (Anas sparsa), feeding above the Mare Dam, Nyanga National Park, Zimbabwe. Like the North American harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) and the South American torrent duck (Merganetta armata), the habitat of this duck is fast-flowing rivers. It is distributed from the Sahel zone and Ethiopia, south to South Africa. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2009
Densely cut tea bushes (Camellia sinensis), Alishan, Taiwan. – Read more about tea on this website, see Traditional medicine: Camellia sinensis. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Cambodia 2009 
Close-up of a coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) leaf, Siem Reap, Cambodia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydlige Afrika 1993
While feeding in a river, this wood sandpiper (Tringa glareola) creates concentric rings on the surface, Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. This smallish wader breeds in marshes of subarctic and northern temperate areas of Europe and Asia, wintering in Africa, South Asia, and Australia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2002-10 
Leaves of an American beech (Fagus grandifolia), casting shadows on the trunk of a yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), Long Island, United States. The yellow-poplar, also called tulip tree, whitewood, and fiddle-tree, is one of the largest East American trees, sometimes reaching a height of 60 metres, with a trunk 3 metres in diameter. The generic name Liriodendron is from the Greek leirion = lily, and dendron = tree, while the name tulip tree refers to the large flowers, which superficially resemble tulips. The species, however, is in fact a member of the magnolia family. The popular name fiddle-tree refers to the peculiar shape of the leaves, which sometimes resembles small violins. This popular tree is the state tree of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014c
Eroded volcanic coastal rocks, covered in a species of sea lettuce, Ulva compressa, Fugueijiao, northern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tanzania 1989 
The underside of a wing of a grey-headed kingfisher (Halcyon leucocephala), Tanzania. This species is widely distributed in Africa, found from Mauritania east to Ethiopia, Somalia, and the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, south to South Africa. It belongs to the group of kingfishers, which are not closely connected with water, mainly feeding on larger insects, lizards etc. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1977-90
Trunks of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica), casting shadows, which form patterns on the forest floor, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2
Multi-coloured leaf of a member of the arum family (Araceae), Parque Nacional de Cahuita, Limón, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Fanø 2001-12
Ripples in a tidal area, with shells of an American razor clam (Ensis americanus), Fanø, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali 2009 
The host tree of this strangler fig (Ficus) has rotted away, and only the ‘skeleton’ of the fig tree remains. – Bali, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014d
Planted trees create an intricate pattern, Huoyan Mountains (’99 Peaks’), Pinglin, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Fyn 2010-16
Sloping, harvested field, Funen, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2010
Fungi on a withered leaf, creating a beautiful design, Basianshan National Forest, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kenya 1988-89
Kenya 1988-89
Lobelia telekii is a very tall member of the bellflower family (Campanulaceae), which is only found in Kenya, on Mount Kenya, Mount Elgon, and in the Aberdare Mountains, growing at altitudes between 3,000 and 5,000 metres. Its flowers, which are pollinated by birds – especially the scarlet-tufted sunbird (Nectarinia johnstoni) – are hidden among long, hairy bracts, giving the plant an extremely hairy appearance. It was named after Count Samuel Teleki de Szék (1845-1916), a Hungarian explorer, who led the first expedition to the northern parts of Kenya (1887-1888). These pictures from the Makinder Valley, Mount Kenya, show the hairy bracts (above), and morning light on a leaf rosette. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali-Lombok 2012
Roots of a tree, exposed on a trekkers’ trail by water erosion, Mount Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tanzania 1988 
Ripples in a tidal area, created by waves, Ras Murundo, Tanzania. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2002-10
Vernal pool with fallen branches, Parker River Wildlife Refuge, Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2
Leaves of a palm species, called palma real (Manicaria saccifera), reflected in water, Tortuguero National Park, Limón, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kenya 1988-89
Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi), showing the distinct rump pattern of this species, Buffalo Springs National Park, Kenya. This zebra has a limited distribution, found only in scattered grasslands in northern Kenya and eastern Ethiopia. Due to its very low numbers, it is regarded as an endangered species. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2012 
Branches and needles of Taiwan red pine (Pinus taiwanensis), Shei-pa National Park, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Indonesien 1985
Onion fields on the lower slopes of Gunung Bromo Volcano, Java, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b 
Eroded coastal rocks, Sandiao Cape, north-eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2012a
Beautiful patterns on a rock wall after heavy rain, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali 2009
Flowers and leaves, which have been brought as an offering to the Hindu Water Temple near Ubud, Bali, Indonesia, are now floating on the surface of a pond. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 2017b 
The small toad rush (Juncus bufonius) is distributed over most of the world, but is restricted to humid areas. In this picture, it grows only in the deepest, most humid grooves of a tractor track, central Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2011
The twisted trunk of an ancient Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva), White Mountains, California, United States. – Read more about the bristlecone pine, and other ancient trees, on this website, see Plants: Ancient and giant trees. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kenya 1988-89 
Pattern on the coat of a spotted genet (Genetta genetta), Kenya. This small viverrid has a wide distribution, found in most of Africa, and along the southern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. At an early stage, it was introduced to Spain, where it quickly formed a wild population. It has since spread north and east through France, into Switzerland, Belgium, and southern Germany. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica
Tracks of numerous hermit crabs create patterns around a fallen fruit on a sandy beach, Parque Nacional Corcovado, Peninsula de Osa, Costa Rica. – Read more about Parque Nacional Corcovado on this website, see Travel episodes: Costa Rica 2012 – Coastal hike to Corcovado. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Lolland-Falster-Møn 1970-86 
Twig of an ivy (Hedera helix), clinging to the trunk of a common hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), Møn, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2013
Withered leaf of Saurauia napaulensis, partly eaten by insects, Ghunsa Valley, eastern Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 1998-99 
Feeding American black ducks (Anas rubripes) create ripples in a creek, Long Island, United States. This close relative of the mallard (A. platyrhynchos) is found in eastern North America, from Saskatchewan and the Great Lakes, east to the Atlantic Coast. The two species often interbreed, which can make identification of the black duck difficult. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Malaysia 1984-85
A wet rainforest leaf, seen from below, Sepilok, Sabah, Borneo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Island-Færøerne 1999
This iceberg, partly covered in moraine, is stranded in a glacial lake, Jökulsárlon, beneath Vatnajökul Glacier, southern Iceland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali 2009
Close-up of a jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), Bali, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bornholm 2008
Common orange lichens (Xanthoria parietina) create concentric rings on a stone wall, Hammershus, Bornholm, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2
Young leaf of bamboo palm, or pacaya (Chamaedorea), Parque Nacional Volcán Arenal, Cordillera de Tilarán, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b 
Patterns on a rock face, Shakadang River, Taroko National Park, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydindien 2008
Bamboo plants, which have just flowered, are now dying, stretching their withering stems towards the sky, Dandeli Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnataka, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydafrika-Namibia 1993
Back pattern of an aardwolf (Proteles cristata), killed by a car, South Africa. This small relative of the hyaenas is fairly common in eastern and southern Africa, but is rarely seen due to its nocturnal habits. The name aardwolf is Afrikaans (the language spoken by immigrating Dutch Boers to South Africa), meaning ‘earth wolf’, relating to the fact that it lives in underground burrows. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2 
Driftwood with numerous holes, made by shipworms, Tortuguero National Park, Limón, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 1998
Horses on a snow-covered field, Manang, Marsyangdi Valley, Annapurna, central Nepal. – Read about horses on this website, see Animals: Animals as servants of Man – Horse, donkey and mule. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Norden 1967-86 
Lichens, growing on a rock, Lake Tunnhovd, Norway. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nordindien 1991
Exposed roots of a huge banyan (Ficus benghalensis), Mount Abu, Rajasthan, India. – Read more about banyan on this website, see Plants: Pipal and banyan – two sacred fig trees. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014d 
Underside of a leaf of giant taro, or giant elephant’s ear (Alocasia macrorrhizos), Taiwan. This giant herb, growing to 5 metres tall, is native from Malaysia south through Indonesia to northern Australia, but has been introduced to many other tropical and subtropical areas as an ornamental, food crop, or animal feed. The rhizome is edible when cooked for a long time, but its sap irritates the skin, as it contains needle-like calcium oxalate crystals. (Source: Scott, S. & Craig, T. (2009). Poisonous Plants of Paradise: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Injuries from Hawaii’s Plants. University of Hawaii Press.) In Hawaii, this plant is called ʻape, and they have a saying: ”Ai no i ka ʻape he maneʻo no ka nuku.” (’The eater of ʻape will have an itchy mouth.’), meaning ’There will be consequences for partaking of something bad.’ (Source: Pukui, M.K. (1986). ‘Ōlelo No’eau, Hawaiian Proverbs and Sayings. Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu.) The gigantic leaves of this plant are often used as umbrellas. It is listed as an invasive in Cuba, New Zealand, and several Pacific islands. In Taiwan, it is ubiquitous in the lowland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 1998-99
This little blue heron (Egretta caerulea) is resting on aerial roots of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle), J. N. Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Florida. This small heron has a very wide distribution, found from south-central and south-eastern United States, south through Mexico and Central America to coastal areas of South America, south to Peru and southern Brazil. The name of the genus, Egretta, is from the French word aigrette, meaning ‘little heron’. Another picture of this species is found on this website, see: In praise of the colour blue. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bornholm 1999-2005 
Shadows from trees, cast on a large growth of daisy (Bellis perennis), mixed with a few dandelions (Taraxacum officinale). – Bornholm, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Cambodia 2010
Fallen leaf of Dipterocarpus alatus, partly eaten by micro-organisms, Angkor Thom, Cambodia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2 
Young leaflet of a fern, unfolding, Parque Nacional Volcán Poás, Cordillera Central, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b
Coastal rocks, Jialeshuei, Kenting National Park, southern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Puerto Rico 2000 
Shadows of fern leaflets create zigzag patterns on one another, El Yunque, Puerto Rico. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 1992
Brown-eyed wolf lichen (Letharia columbiana), growing in concentric rings around the trunk of a white fir (Abies concolor), Sequoia National Park, California, United States. Formerly, this species, belonging to the family Parmeliaceae, was used by native peoples in California as arrow poison, and the Okanagan-Colville tribe used it medicinally, internally for stomach problems, externally for wounds. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2012
Pine pollen create patterns on the surface of a rainwater puddle, Pine Barrens, New Jersey, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tanzania 1990 
Detail of a withering coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) leaf, northern Tanzania. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2015
Feeding tunnels on the trunk of an ash (Fraxinus excelsior), made by ash bark-beetle (Hylesinus fraxini) larvae, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydafrika-Namibia 1993 
Ripples on a sand dune, caused by wind, Sossusvlei, Namibia. – Read more about nature in Namibia on this website, see Countries and places: Namibia – a desert country. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Tunesien 1987
Cracked mud in a dried-out wadi (desert wash), Metlaoui, Tunisia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Fyn 2010-16
Unripe cone of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), showing the characteristic three-pronged bracts of the species, Funen, Denmark. This conifer is native to western North America, with two varieties, one coastal, growing from British Columbia south to central California, and one montane, found in the Rocky Mountains from British Columbia south to Mexico. Today, however, it is cultivated almost worldwide for its excellent timber. It is named after David Douglas (1799-1834), a Scottish botanist and collector, who first reported it. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 1992
USA 1992
All but one of the 21 extant armadillo species live in Central and South America, only one, the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), reaching North America. Since its arrival in Texas in the 1880s and in Florida in the 1920s, this species has spread north to North Carolina, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, and Missouri. Climate change is the likely explanation to its occurrence in southern states like Georgia, South Carolina, and Oklahoma. However, biologists never thought that the winters of North Carolina, Indiana, or Missouri were mild enough to support an armadillo population, and a harsh winter or two would undoubtedly knock them back. (Source: scientificamerican.com/article/armadillo-moves-north-across-warmer-north-america). Incidentally, the word armadillo means ‘the little armoured one’ in Spanish. These pictures of nine-banded armadillo are from Louisiana, the lower one showing details of its armour plates. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Vorsø 2000-15
This common elm (Ulmus glabra) in Denmark was killed by Dutch elm disease, caused by a sac fungus, Ophiostoma (Ceratocystis) novo-ulmi. To the right a dried-out polypore fungus. – Read more about Dutch elm disease on this website, see Vorsø on my mind: Dutch elm disease on Vorsø. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2012
Patterns on a withering banana leaf, Lugu, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Malaysia 1984-85 
An epiphytic fern, growing on a slender tree trunk in a rainforest, is illuminated by a patch of sunshine, Sepilok, Sabah, Borneo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013
Green algae, growing on eroded coastal rocks, Montaña de Oro State Park, California, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Indonesien 1985 
Knot on the trunk of a dead tree, Gunung Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2012
Slender grass stems, Shei-pa National Park, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2016 
Pattern on the underside of fallen bark, Haverhill, Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

(Uploaded June 2017)

 

(Revised continuously)