Snow and ice

 

 

ABFyn-8
YFyn-10
Icicles from a roof, bent inwards by repeated thawing and freezing (top). Melted snow from these icicles has frozen on a cotoneaster. – Funen, Denmark. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In the 1980s and 1990s, I spent several winters on the island of Vorsø, a nature reserve in Horsens Fjord, Denmark. During these stays, I could enjoy a number of very beautiful impressions. Below, a collection of winter pictures from this interesting reserve is presented. Other pictures are found elsewhere on this website, see: Vorsø on my mind, in which a number of winter experiences are related.

 

Vorsø 1975-87
In severe winters, each falling tide leaves a thin layer of frozen saltwater on emerging stones. The following rising tide will press this layer outwards, leaving a new thin layer of ice inside the previous layer. In this way, several rising and falling tides create a ’flower’ with delicate ice petals. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Vorsø 1975-87
Other ice sculptures, created around stones in Horsens Fjord. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 2000-2020
Leaves of dewberry (Rubus caesius), covered in rime. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
The sun sets in an orgy of red and orange over Horsens Fjord, adorning the sea ice with gorgeous patterns. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 2000-2010
These catkins of common hazel (Corylus avellana) were formed already in late autumn, and now they are covered in rime, ready to burst with the first sign of spring. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Ice flakes, pushed up along a crack in the sea ice. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 2000-2020
Fruits of great burdock (Arctium lappa), covered in rime. – Read more about this species elsewhere on this website, see Traditional medicine: Arctium lappa. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 2000-2020
Today, the common male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas) has taken over huge areas of the former fields on Vorsø. This partly withered plant is almost covered by snow. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Wind-made patterns in a compact layer of snow around a coastal stone on the southern shore of the island. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1988-99
Hips of dog rose (Rosa canina), covered in snow. This plant is extremely common on Vorsø. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Common snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) is one of the first harbingers of spring, often appearing before the winter snow has disappeared. In former days, this species was cultivated on Vorsø, and today it has escaped many places around the farm house. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Fruit spike of common bulrush (Typha latifolia), covered in rime. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

If you walk around the Annapurna Range, central Nepal, you must cross over the pass Thorung La (5415 m). People in this area are mainly Buddhists, and the peak of this pass is marked by a chorten (a Tibetan variety of the stupa) and vividly coloured prayer flags. Below, five winter pictures from this area are shown. Elsewhere on this website, you may read about chortens and prayer flags, and about Buddhism in general, see Religion: Buddhism.

 

Nepal 2009-2
Rays from the rising sun illuminate the snow-clad peak of Annapurna II (7,937 m), seen from the Upper Marsyangdi Valley. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1998
Yaks, grazing in a snow-covered landscape, Jarsang Khola Valley. The pointed mountain is Khatung Kang (6,488 m). – Read about yaks elsewhere on this website, see Animals: Animals as servants of Man. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1998
One morning, we found these partly melted pugmarks in the snow in the Jarsang Khola Valley, signifying that a snow leopard (Uncia uncia) had passed here the previous night. These large and elusive cats live in mountains of Central Asia, but have been hunted to extinction in many areas because of their rich and beautiful fur. In Buddhist areas of the Himalaya, hunting is banned, and in these areas this rare cat has safe havens, where it can prey on species like bharal (Pseudois nayaur), urial (Ovis vignei), Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus), and Himalayan musk deer (Moschus chrysogaster). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1998
Morning sun, illuminating snow-covered mountains around the Thorung La Pass. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1998
Eroded gullies near Thorung La. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Norden 1992-98
Coots (Fulica atra), walking on the ice-covered Lake Hornborgasjön, Västergötland, Sweden. Another picture of this species is found elsewhere on this website, see Nature: Urban nature. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In January 1999, I spent some days in and around Portland, Maine, United States – days of freezing temperatures and heavy wind. It was indeed a cold, but also very beautiful experience, as the following pictures show.

 

USA 1998-99
Frozen pond, surrounded by trees, covered in frozen rain, Cape Elizabeth. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

USA 1998-99
Frozen rain on a paper birch (Betula papyrifera), Freeport. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

USA 1998-99
USA 1998-99
Branches, covered in frozen rain, shining like silver under a Full Moon, Portland. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

USA 1998-99
This snowman in Portland partly melted in the sunshine, causing it to tilt. However, during the night it froze again, assuming an unusual position. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In 2011, I participated in an expedition to the Chukotka Peninsula, north-eastern Siberia. Read more about this expedition elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Siberia 2011 – Caterpillar trip across Chukotka.

 

Chukotka 2011
Our transportation in Chukotka took place in an old army caterpillar. In this picture, it is crossing a stream, bordered by snow walls. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chukotka 2011
Spring in Chukotka: Meltwater and snow walls along a stream. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In the summer 1999, I joined a group of Scandinavians on a hike in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan. The following four pictures show impressions from this trip.

 

Kirgisien 1999
Glacier with patterns, created by deposited moraine, Yrdyk Valley. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Kirgisien 1999
Mountains, snow, and fog, Kaska Su Valley. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Kirgisien 1999
Horse riders in a snow-covered landscape, Arashan Valley. – Read about horses elsewhere on this website, see Animals: Animals as servants of Man. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Kirgisien 1999
This lady’s mantle (Alchemilla) has been covered in snow during the night, Kaska Su Valley. – Read about medical usage of lady’s mantle elsewhere on this website, see Traditional medicine: Alchemilla. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Alperne 1968-2001
This sign in the Lammartal Valley, Austria, says ‘Honey for sale’. Presumably, it was placed here in the summertime, but maybe there is still a few jars left? (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The Barun Valley is an alpine valley, situated in Makalu-Barun National Park, which covers an area of c. 1,500 square kilometres in northern Nepal. To the west, this park borders Sagarmatha National Park, covering 1148 square kilometres, to the north the huge Qomolangma Nature Preserve in Tibet, covering c. 35,000 square kilometres, and to the south a buffer zone, covering 830 square kilometres. Thus, the valley is situated in the heart of a very large protected area.

In spring 1991, together with Lars Nørgaard Hansen, I undertook a very interesting hike to this valley. You may read more about this trip elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Plant hunting in the Himalaya – The rhododendron valley.

Below, four winter impressions from this trip are presented.

 

Nepal 1991a
When huge hailstones suddenly began falling in the Arun Valley, we hurriedly sought shelter. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1991a
Our porters, struggling through snow and fog near the Shipton La Pass (4,216 m). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1991a
On our way across this pass, we met another group of porters, heading the opposite way. Note that the woman is bare-footed. If she had been one of our porters, we would have bought her a pair of sneakers! Unfortunately, we did not have a spare pair to give her. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1991a
Frozen meltwater lakes and deposited moraine gravel on the Lower Barun Glacier, Barun Valley. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The snow goose (Anser caerulescens) comes in two colour morphs, a snow-white phase, which has given this species its common name, and a bluish-grey phase, referred to as ‘blue goose’, which has given it the specific name caerulescens, meaning ‘bluish’.

The snow goose is a bird of the New World, breeding mainly in northern Canada and Alaska, with small populations in Greenland and north-eastern Siberia. It spends the winter along the Pacific coast, from southern British Columbia southwards, and also in southern United States and Mexico.

 

Californien 2013a
Snow goose, Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, California. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Chile 2011a
View from inside an ice cave in the Sierra Nevada, Parque Nacional Conguillio, Chile. The taller trees with white trunks are the national tree of Chile, pehuén (Araucaria araucana), in English called ‘monkey-puzzle tree’. – Read more about this tree, and about Parque Nacional Conguillio, elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Chile 2011 – The white forest. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1991-95
Poplars (Populus), covered in rime, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nordindien 1997
During a snowstorm below the Rohtang Pass (3,978 m), Himachal Pradesh, India, this roadside vendor continues roasting corn cobs, while his partner seeks shelter under a huge umbrella. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The snowy egret (Egretta thula) is named after its snow-white plumage. This small heron, which is very similar to the Old World little egret (E. garzetta), is found in South and Central America, and also in parts of North America, where some populations are migratory, wintering further south.

The generic name is from a French word, aigrette, meaning ‘little heron’. In 1782, the specific name, thula, was given to this bird by a mistake by Chilean Jesuit priest and naturalist Juan Ignacio Molina (1740-1829), who didn’t realize that in fact thula was the local Mapuduncun name for the black-necked swan (Cygnus melancoryphus).

 

Costa Rica-2
Snowy egret, Tortuguero National Park, Limón, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 1969-2005
Tombstones, partly covered by snow, in a Jewish cemetery in Copenhagen, Denmark. – More pictures of tombstones are found elsewhere on this website, see Culture: Graves. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1991-95
Rime-covered fence, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The snow bunting (Calcarius nivalis) is aptly named, as it breeds in the High Arctic, spending the winter in snowy fields and coastal meadows further south. Its plumage is also predominantly snow-white. This species has a northern circumpolar distribution, with isolated populations in northern Scotland, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, and Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

Previously, the snow bunting, under the name Plectrophenax nivalis, was placed in the bunting family (Emberizidae), but recent DNA research has shown that it is in fact a species of longspur, which, together with the other longspurs, forms a distinct clade, now constituting a family of their own, Calcariidae.

 

Chukotka 2011
Male snow bunting, taking off from a rusty pipe, Chukotka, Siberia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Fyn 2010-17
Beauty bush (Kolwitzia amabilis), covered in rime, Funen, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2002
The Tibetan snowcock (Tetraogallus tibetanus) is a large gamebird, which is rather common in drier areas of the High Himalaya. These birds are feeding near Tughla, Sagarmatha National Park, Khumbu, Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1977-90
Pack ice, pushed ashore, eastern Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Guizhou 2009
Terraced fields, covered in a thin layer of newly fallen snow, Wumeng Shan Mountains, Guizhou Province, China. – Read more about this area elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: China 2009 – Among black-necked cranes. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2000-01
Cracked sea ice in evening light, Mill Neck Creek, Long Island, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydasien 1978-79
Snow wall, covering a mountain near Chhukung, Khumbu, eastern Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nordindien 1982
Avalanche, roaring down the Bethartoli Glacier, Nanda Devi National Park, Uttarakhand, India. – Read more about this national park elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: India 1982 – Pleasures of Nanda Devi. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In 1984, the mute swan (Cygnus olor) was elected the national bird of Denmark – an appropriate choice, as it is very common. This was not always the case. In the 1800s, swans were hunted in Denmark, and by 1920, only three or four pairs were breeding in the vicinity of Copenhagen. Swans were protected in 1926, and the mute swan soon began spreading across the country.

The winter is a hard time for these birds, and in severe weather conditions, many succumb to cold and starvation.

 

Sjælland 1969-2005
These mute swans are resting on the ice-covered Roskilde Fjord, Zealand, waiting for milder weather. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Lolland-Falster-Møn 1987-2010
Lolland-Falster-Møn 1987-2010
In this picture, numerous mute swans are gathered around a crack in the sea ice, near the island of Møn. Some have already succumbed, while others are dying. The dark spots on the ice are excreta from the birds. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Common mare’s tail (Hippuris vulgaris) is a striking plant, growing in shallow freshwater. It is distributed in northern Eurasia, south to the Himalaya, northern China, and Japan, in Greenland, and in northern and western North America, south to California, New Mexico, Illinois, and New England.

The generic name is from the Greek hippos (‘horse’) and oura (‘tail’), thus horsetail. In English, it is also sometimes called horsetail, although this name is usually reserved for species of the genus Equisetum. Previously, Hippuris was the only genus in the family Hippuridaceae, but has now been moved to the plantain family (Plantaginaceae).

Common mare’s tail is utilized in herbal medicine for treatment of wounds, stomach ulcers, and internal and external bleeding.

 

Island 1989-91
Rime on common mare’s tail, growing in an ice-covered pond, near Akureyri, northern Iceland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1977-90
Drying socks, covered in rime, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Snowfinches (Montifringilla) are a small genus of eight high-altitude passerines, mainly distributed in Central Asia. A single species, the white-winged snowfinch (M. nivalis), is found further west, through the Middle East to the Alps and the Pyrenees. Despite their name, snowfinches are not finches, but sparrows, of the family Passeridae.

 

Tibet 1987
This Tibetan, or black-winged, snowfinch (Montifringilla adamsi) is feeding on seeds, Nagarze, Tibet. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 1994-95
During a hike in the Upper Ghunsa Valley, eastern Nepal, we were camping at Lhonak. In the morning, we woke up to a snow-covered landscape. – Read more about this hike elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Nepal 1994 – A close call. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Lahaul-Ladakh 2014
Frozen waterfall, Taglang La Pass (5,328 m), Ladakh, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The snow plant (Sarcodes sanguinea), which belongs to the heath family (Ericaceae), is a parasite, deriving its nutrients from underground fungi, which live in symbiosis with tree roots. It is found in the Cascade Range of Oregon and California, south to northern Baja California, Mexico.

The common name refers to the early flowering of this species, often appearing, when snow is still covering the ground. The specific name sanguinea means ‘blood-red’, which, of course, refers to the striking colour of this plant.

 

USA-Canada 1992
Snow plant, photographed in the Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The large-flowered viburnum (Viburnum grandiflorum) is distributed from Pakistan eastwards to south-eastern Tibet, growing at altitudes between 2,700 and 3,700 metres. This species is among the few high-altitude Himalayan trees, which bloom in winter and early spring.

 

Uttarakhand 2008
The inflorescence of this large-flowered viburnum is covered in ice, which fell as snow the previous night, partly melted, and then froze. – Dodi Tal, Asi Ganga Valley, Uttarakhand, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Alperne 1968-2001
A snow-clad Salzburg, Austria, seen from the city’s great castle, Hohen Salzburg. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1991-95
Evening sun on grass, covered in rime, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Norden 1967-86
Freezing rain has left these catkins of goat willow (Salix caprea) inside an armour of ice, Ruda, Kalmar County, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

As its name implies, the snow pigeon (Columba leuconota) lives in cold regions. This species is very common in higher mountains, from Afghanistan east to the Yunnan Province, China, and from the Himalaya north to the Qinghai Province, China.

 

Nordindien 1997
In winter, snow pigeons gather in large flocks, as here in the Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Nepal 1987
Snow pigeon, taking off from a rock, Namche Bazaar, Khumbu, eastern Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Nepal 2013
Nepal 2013

Snow-covered mountains around Kyanjin Gompa, Langtang National Park, central Nepal. The upper picture shows morning light on Langtang Lirung, at 7,245 metres the highest mountain in this park. – Read about my adventures in this area elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Nepal 2009 – Across a snow-covered pass. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Guizhou 2009
This village in the Wumeng Shan Mountains, Guizhou Province, China, is covered in a thin layer of newly fallen snow. – Read more about this area elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: China 2009 – Among black-necked cranes. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus) is a native of North America, but has been introduced as an ornamental to many other parts of the world.

 

Fyn 2005-09
Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus) was named after its snow-white berries. In this picture from Funen, Denmark, the tiny pink flowers of this species are also seen. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1967-76
Forest walk with a pram, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Primroses (Primula) are ubiquitous in the Himalaya. A number of species from these mountains are presented elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Plants of the Himalaya. Two winter pictures are shown below.

 

Nepal 2008
Snow, falling the previous night, has partly buried these flowers of Primula irregularis, Helambu, central Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Uttarakhand 2008
This flower of Primula sessilis, encountered in the Asi Ganga Valley, Uttarakhand, India, is partly covered in ice that fell the previous night as snow, which partly melted, and then froze. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Guizhou 2009
Rime-covered needles and flower buds of a pine (Pinus), Wumeng Shan, Guizhou Province, China. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Island-Færøerne 1999
This iceberg, partly covered in moraine, is stranded in a glacial lake, called Jökulsárlon, beneath the Vatnajökul Glacier, southern Iceland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA-Canada 1992
Growth of red algae on ice, covering Reflection Lake, Mount Rainier, Washington, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

A mountainous area north of Kathmandu, central Nepal, holds 54 lakes, all of which are sacred to Hindus. Every year, during Full Moon in July or August, thousands of devout pilgrims undertake the demanding hike to these lakes to have a cleansing bath in their icy waters. Orthodox Hindus wish to bathe in all 54 lakes.

Read more about the Gosainkund lakes elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Plant hunting in the Himalaya – Around sacred lakes of Shiva. Hinduism in general is dealt with in detail at Religion: Hinduism.

 

Nepal 2009-1
My guide Tanka Bahadur Pantha enjoys a brief lull in a snow storm below the Laurebina La Pass (4609 m), Gosainkund. The lake in the background is Surya Kund. In the Hindu pantheon, Surya is the Sun God. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Due to their floating, heart-shaped leaves, a group of plants of the genus Nymphoides, which belong to the bog-bean family (Menyanthaceae), are called floating hearts. One species, N. indica, is named Indian snowflake after its fringed flowers, which resemble snowflakes.

 

Nepal 2009-2
Indian snowflake, photographed in Lake Phewa Tal, Pokhara, Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2016
Snow, falling on poplar trees (Populus), Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Alperne 2016
Tourists, visiting the glacier beneath Grossglockner, at 3,798 metres the highest mountain in Austria. During the last fifty years, this glacier has been melting at an alarming rate. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The snow lion is a mythical creature of Central Asia, which, according to local belief, ranges over mountains and glaciers. It symbolizes strength, fearlessness, and joy.

 

Nepal 2002
The base of this chorten (Tibetan style Buddhist stupa) at Tharke Ghyang, Helambu, central Nepal, is adorned with reliefs, depicting snow lions. – Read more about chortens, and about Buddhism in general, elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Buddhism. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Tibet 1987
This wall painting, depicting a snow lion, is found in the Jokhang Temple, Lhasa, Tibet. – Read more about this temple, and about Tibet in general, elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Tibet 1987 – Tibetan summer. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Guizhou 2009
Rhododendron flowers, covered in rime, Wumeng Shan Mountains, Guizhou Province, China. – Read about rhododendrons elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Rhododendrons. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Island 1989-91
Snow-covered mountains in morning sun, Isafjördur, northern Iceland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nordindien 1982
Queen of Spain fritillary (Issoria issaea), sitting on newly fallen snow, Nanda Devi National Park, Uttarakhand, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2008
Dwarf bamboo, partly covered in newly fallen snow, Langtang National Park, central Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The common eider (Somateria mollissima) has an almost circumpolar distribution, found along Arctic coasts in Europe, eastern Siberia, and North America. It also breeds in some northern temperate areas.

 

Island-Færøerne 1999
Eiders in Jökulsárlon, a glacial lake with melting icebergs, which have broken off the Vatnajökul Glacier, southern Iceland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Snowbells, of the genus Soldanella, comprising about 15 species, are found in montane areas of southern Europe, from the Pyrenees east to the Balkans. The common name snowbell refers to the early flowering of these plants, which often appear in depressions, shortly after the snow has melted. The generic name Soldanella is a diminutive of the Italian word soldo (‘coin’), thus ‘little coins’, referring to the leaf shape of most species of this genus.

 

Alperne 2016a
Alperne 2016a
An abundance of dwarf snowbell (Soldanella pusilla), growing in a depression near Hochtor, Grossglockner, Austria. – A picture of the alpine snowbell (S. alpina) is found elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Asia & Europe 1975 – Long journey home. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2008
Branches of a Himalayan silver fir (Abies spectabilis), covered in newly fallen snow, Langtang National Park, central Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The rosebay willow-herb (Chamerion angustifolium) is a colonizer of disturbed areas, readily invading forests clearings and abandoned fields. An excellent example of its ability to completely take over newly abandoned fields can be studied elsewhere on this website, see: Vorsø on my mind – Expanding wilderness.

 

Vorsø 1975-87
The stem of this rosebay willow-herb is covered in rime, bending it to the ground. – Nature reserve Vorsø, Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

(Uploaded October 2017)

 

(Revised continuously)