Folk art of Taiwan

 

 

Old MacDonald had a farm!” These lanterns were exhibited at the Taiwanese Lantern Festival, celebrated in the city of Tainan during Chinese New Year 2005 (Year of the Rooster). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Guitarist, made from joined pieces of wood, exhibited near the town of Shenghsing. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This mural in the city of Taichung depicts shops, a farm, and men, performing tai chi. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Beetle, made from bamboo branches, Dongshih, near Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Generally, the Taiwanese are a delightful and simple people, who love simple things. This fact is obvious in the everyday picture through the rich and flourishing folk art, which adorns house gables, embankments along roads, and innumerable other places.

Other examples of Taiwanese art may be seen in the ubiquitous Daoist temples, which are adorned with countless sculptures, carvings, reliefs, wall paintings, and paper lanterns, depicting Chinese mythology, gods, dragons, Feng-Huang (often erroneously called ‘Chinese Phoenix’), tigers, lions etc. This artwork can be studied on the pages Religion: Daoism in Taiwan, and Culture: Lamps and lights.

Artwork, created by the indigenous peoples of Taiwan, is shown on a separate page, Culture: Tribal art of Taiwan.

 

 

Aogu is a marvelous wetland north of the town of Dongshih, south-western Taiwan. In this area, various artwork has been exhibited.

Incidentally, many birds from this wetland are presented on the page Animals – Birds: Birds in Taiwan.

 

 

This mosaic, made on a concrete wall beneath a bridge, depicts birdlife in the Aogu Wetlands. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The picture below shows a mural in Aogu Village, depicting a number of subjects, including an owl, saying “Who?” (Probably meants as a joke, as it is also an imitation of an owl’s hooting.) The Chinese text means something like ‘Hello, little black beauty!’ Maybe it refers to the walking ants beneath, which are carrying a fish on a spear.

 

 

(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Exhibition ‘hall’ in Aogu Village, made from split bamboo stems, which have been adorned with oyster shells and an image of some kind of bird. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Another owl, made from old flip-flops, tennis balls, and rope. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This bird has been made from bits of wood. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Oyster shells, glued onto a wall to form a heron. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

As its name implies, the Taiwan blue magpie (Urocissa caerulea) is endemic to Taiwan, living in broad-leaved forests at medium elevations, chiefly between 300 and 1,200 m.

This gorgeous bird was first collected by British biologist Robert Swinhoe (1836-1877) who, in 1860, became the first European consular representative to Taiwan. He discovered many new species, and 4 mammals and 15 birds are named after him. He called the Taiwan blue magpie long-tailed mountain nymph, from its old Chinese name 長尾山娘 (‘long-tailed mountain lady’).

Naturally, this iconic bird is lavishly represented in Taiwanese folk art. Several examples are shown on this page, others on the page Culture: Tribal art of Taiwan.

 

 

Mural in the village of Chingliao, near Chiayi. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Crash barriers along Taiwanese roads are often adorned with children’s art. The first group of pictures are from the city of Taichung.
 

 

 

Taiwan 2017a
Taiwan 2017a
These two paintings were made to promote traffic safety. The text in the upper picture says: “Fasten your seat-belt”, whereas the one in the lower picture says: “Don’t cross, when there is a red light, so that you can get home safely.” (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Chinese in traditional dress, pulling a cat’s ear. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Four happy animals: a lion, a fox, a squirrel, and a hedgehog. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018a
Long-necked giraffe with birds, a monkey, a teddy bear, and a cat. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan_2018_039
Longish lion, wearing a red cape. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan_2018_038
Artsy cat. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018a
Marine life: Octopus, whale, dolphin, fish, and starfish. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Children, performing a lion dance. During Daoist festivals, this dance is a common feature at Taiwanese temples. A picture, depicting this dance, is shown on the page Religion: Daoism in Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan_2018_040
Fairies, living in mushrooms. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018a
Rabbit. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tyrkiet 2018e
A very feminine unicorn. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

These paintings on crash barriers were seen near the town of Rueilli.

 

 

School bus with happy passengers. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Fairies, one with butterfly wings. The other one is happy, despite being trapped in a bottle. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Smiling cat and dragonfly. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sad dragon, emitting smoke from its nostrils. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

As bamboo is an extremely common plant in Taiwan, it is only natural that bamboo items often occur in local folk art.

 

 

Lobster, made from bamboo branches, Dongshih, near Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis), also called Japanese or Manchurian crane, breeds in large reedbeds in Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, and south-eastern Siberia, and a small population is also found on the island of Hokkaido, Japan. Despite the fact that this crane is a very rare visitor to Taiwan, it is commonly depicted as ornamentation in Daoist temples.

 

 

Red-crowned crane, made from bamboo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Erosion from sea and wind has shaped the soft Daliao Sandstone rocks in Yeliou Geopark, northern Taiwan, creating fantastic formations, including gigantic ‘mushrooms’. Many of these rocks are shown on the page Nature: Nature’s artwork.

 

 

This kitschy puppet, exhibited in Yeliou Geopark, depicts a ‘mushroom’ rock. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The woman in the wall painting below, seen in Taichung, is busy planting vegetables in her garden. The birds to the left are little egrets (Egretta garzetta). This bird is presented on the page Animals – Birds: Birds in Taiwan.

 

 

(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Stone benches with sculptures, depicting rabbits (top) and an owl, near Puli. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The threatened black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) breeds on islets off the west coast of Korea, on offshore islets in Liaoning Province in China, and since 2006 also a few pairs in the Tumen Estuary in Russia. (Source: Birdlife International)

From an estimated number as high as 10,000, the population plummeted to a low of 288 individuals in 1988. Since then, conservation efforts have caused the population to increase to c. 4,000 individuals in 2017. With a total of c. 2,500 birds, southern Taiwan is the most important wintering area for this species.

Naturally, this iconic bird is lavishly represented in Taiwanese folk art. Some examples are shown below.

 

 

Taiwan 2017
Wall painting, Cigu Wetlands, near Tainan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2016
Sculpture, near Dongshih, south-western Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

During the Tainan Lantern Festival in 2005 (described elsewhere on this page), this lantern depicts a black-faced spoonbill.

 

 

Taiwan 2018c
This drawing was made by a school child. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Kitschy sculpture, depicting a whale, Longdong, north-eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Every spring, thousands of butterflies migrate from their wintering quarters in southern Taiwan towards northern parts of the island. During this period, large nets are erected along many highways to reduce the number of butterflies killed by cars. When the butterflies hit the net, most of them will fly upwards and pass the highway at a safe altitude.

 

 

Taiwan 2014b
Artwork on a river levee at Linbei Chukou, near Linnei, depicting the butterfly migration, and also local village life. Nets have been erected along the highway in the background. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

During the Daoist festival Tzuoh Jiaw, held in the village of Dalinpo near Kaohshiung, local gods are worshipped to prevent bad events. Other events, including pranks, also take place during this festival.

Other Daoist festivals are described on the page Religion: Daoism in Taiwan.

 

 

During Tzuoh Jiaw, four men are performing a ‘bullfight’, while two other men simulate a fight. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2010
This painting on a wall in the town of Jhuolan depicts a creature, which resembles a cross between a shark and a whale. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In Taiwan, the sika deer (Cervus nippon) was almost exterminated due to excessive hunting, but has now been re-introduced in several places. Occasionally, this deer is displayed in Taiwanese folk art.

 

 

This signpost in Sheding Nature Park, Kenting National Park, is shaped as a sika deer. The text says: “Keep walking! Approaching to exit!” (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This kitschy metal sculpture, depicting a sika deer, acts as an eye-catcher for a hotel in Sheding Nature Park. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sika deer, made from branches, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This Daoist grave near Chunri, southern Taiwan, is adorned with a relief, depicting a sika deer. Many other pictures, depicting Daoist graves, are shown on the page Culture: Graves. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The wax apple (Syzygium samarangense), also called Java apple or Semarang rose-apple, is a tropical tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), which may reach a height of 12 m. Its place of origin is probably the Malay Peninsula and the Greater Sunda Islands, but it was introduced at an early stage to many other areas in Asia, and today it is widely cultivated in the tropics for its delicious fruits.

 

 

Huge sculpture in the town of Fangliao, depicting a wax apple. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This painting on a wall, surrounding a park in Neimen, southern Taiwan, depicts a dog, balancing a mango fruit on its snout. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The fig tree in the picture below, which had sprouted in a crack in a concrete wall along a street in Taichung, was cut down. However, some roots were still remaining, and holes were drilled into the wood, creating a piece of art. The holes were possibly provided as breeding places for solitary bees or other insects.

 

 

(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The tile in the picture below, exhibited in a park near the Lanyan River, north-eastern Taiwan, depicts bamboo with a resting cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis). This bird is described on the page Animals – Birds: Birds in Taiwan.

 

 

(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In Greek mythology, Leda was a beautiful Aetolian princess, who was desired by Zeus. Assuming the shape of a swan, which was fleeing from a pursuing eagle, Zeus fell into Leda’s arms for protection, whereupon he had intercourse with her.

How many women did he desire, that lecher!

 

 

Tawdry wall painting in Taichung, depicting Leda and the swan. You would hardly expect this painting to adorn the façade of a shoe shop, but this is in fact the case! (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Strolling through a suburban neighbourhood in Taichung, I came across a delightful selection of kitschy murals, several of which are shown below.

 

 

Boy, herding Beijing ducks. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Outdoor restaurant. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Farmer with a water buffalo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The painting in the pictures below occupies an entire house end. It depicts a waterfall, a Taiwan blue magpie (Urocissa caerulea), and an Asian black bear (Ursus thibetanus, previously called Selenarctos thibetanus). The latter is holding on to a number of strings, attached to balloons with a text saying “Welcome to Yung-an District”.

Other pieces of art, depicting the Taiwan blue magpie, are shown elsewhere on this page. The sad fate of the Asian black bear is described on the page Traditional medicine.

 

 

(Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Qingshui, known locally as Zushi-Gong, is the principal god worshipped in Qingshui Zushi Miao, a Daoist temple in the town of Sanxia, northern Taiwan. This temple is popularly known as the ‘Bird Temple’, due to the numerous depictions of birds on walls and columns. No less than 106 different bird species have been identified here, including six endemics.

 

 

Column in the Zushi Temple with carvings, depicting red-crowned cranes (Grus japonicus) and lotus flowers (Nelumbo nucifera). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This carving undoubtedly depicts a species of scops owl (Otus). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Carving, depicting a Taiwan blue magpie (Urocissa caerula). This bird is described elsewhere on this page. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This dead tree in the village of Chingliao, near Chiayi, has been ‘adorned’ with rusted metal parts. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Pork is a very popular food item in Taiwan, so, naturally, pigs abound in Taiwanese folk art. Three examples are shown below.

 

 

Pigs, made from a tree trunk and branches, Puli. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Happy pig, made of clay. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2016
Pig’s face, made from concrete, pebbles, and a small flower pot, near Sanyi. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwanese marionette puppet show is a type of opera, in which the performance is done through cloth puppets. These puppets originated in the 17th Century in the Chinese Fujian Province. From this province, many people emigrated to Taiwan, where marionette puppet show soon became a popular art form.

Head, hands, and feet are made of carved wood, while the body and limbs consist of cloth. During the performance, a person makes the puppet move, using his gloved hand inside the puppet. In the old days, the puppets resembled sacks, hence the name 布袋戲 (bu dai xi), which literally means ‘cloth bag opera’. (Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glove_puppetry)

During the Hsin Shing-Kuo Puppet Show, a marionette performance taking place in the town of Huwei, western Taiwan, Judy’s niece Guo-chin and I won these fine puppets in a lottery. In the lower picture, we are posing together with the 86-year-old grandson of the founder of this troupe.

 

 

(Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The Pilgrimage to the West is a mythological novel by Wu Cheng-en (1500-1582), in which a monk, Xuan-zang, travels to western China with his three disciples, Sun Wu-kong (‘Monkey’), who is armed with a magic stick, Zhu Ba-jie (‘Pig’), who is armed with a rake-like weapon, and Sha Wu-jing, who is responsible for the luggage, transported on a horse.

The picture below shows a scene from the Hsin Shing-Kuo Puppet Show, relating an episode from The Pilgrimage to the West, in which Monkey, assisted by a Heavenly Goddess, manages to kill a demon, who has abducted the monk.

 

 

 
(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Taiwan 2018
This iron fence, surrounding a park in Taichung, is adorned with images of a frog (top) and an eagle. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

These balloon-like puppets, depicting two monkeys and a chicken, have become faded by sunshine. They were displayed in a garden in Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In Chinese mythology, the dragon is a symbol of power, strength, and good luck. Its important role in Daoism is described on the page Religion: Daoism in Taiwan.

 

 

Taiwan 2010
Dragon, made from grass, which has been woven around a metal frame. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2016
This hedge near Sanyi is trimmed to form a dragon’s head. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Metal sculptures, depicting ‘garden fairies’, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The tiles in the pictures below, made by school children, are exhibited in Central Taiwan Science Park, Taichung.

 

 

Happy horse. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Dancing cat. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Frog on a waterlily leaf, just about to strike at some creature with its tongue. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

It seems that this man is eager to have a boxing match with a creature, which resembles a guinea pig, but maybe it is a black-and-white cow? (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Hen on eggs. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sika deer. This species is described elsewhere on this page. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Smiling rabbits. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Images, consisting of painted cement, are often exhibited in Taiwan.

 

The fly amanita (Amanita muscaria) is a most striking mushroom, having a bright red cap with numerous white ‘spots’, which are in fact are remnants of a membrane that encloses the mushroom in its young stage. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, but has been introduced to many places in the Southern Hemisphere.

This species has hallucinogenic properties and was formerly used as an intoxicant by indigenous peoples of Siberia and Lapland. This subject is described in depth on the page Books: Seed of Knowledge, Stones of Plenty, Chapter 3.

 

 

Sculptures, depicting fly amanitas, Nanhua Ecological Park, southern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The grey wolf (Canis lupus), or simply wolf, is widespread in Europe, Arabia, the Middle East, and northern parts of Asia, as well as in North America. About 37 subspecies are recognized, some of which may merit specific status. The total number of wolves is estimated at 300,000.

 

 

Kitschy sculptures, depicting wolves, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The mikado pheasant (Syrmaticus mikado), which is endemic to Taiwan, is restricted to the highest mountain areas of the island.

 

 

This sculpture, depicting a male mikado pheasant, acts as an eye-catcher for a hotel near Dasyueshan National Forest, where this bird is present. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Cross-eyed dog, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

These images, depicting ducks, are exhibited as eye catchers at the ‘Duck Café’, near Guoxing. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kitschy lion and giraffe, exhibited at a small Daoist temple, Taichung. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Artistic arrangement of flower pots, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Hedgehog, made from felt and yarn, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In my opinion, most graffiti is pure junk, but occasionally you may come across small pieces of art. Two such examples, both from Taichung, are shown below.

 

 

(Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

During the Taiwanese Lantern Festival, which is celebrated during the Chinese New Year, elaborate lanterns are produced in the thousands. These pictures from Tainan were taken during Chinese New Year 2005 (Year of the Rooster).

 

 

Naturally, a large number of lanterns at this festival depicted roosters, as it was celebrating the start of the Year of the Rooster. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This lantern depicts a tiger. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Weight-lifting hippo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Penguins. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Two cats, resembling Disney’s Aristocats. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This sculpture in Taichung, which resembles a Christmas tree, consists of an iron scaffold, ‘adorned’ with old safety helmets, golf balls, wires with gleaming bulbs, etc. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Painted sculptures, depicting cyclists, Taichung. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Marry me!” – This rather dilapidated ‘wedding coach’ in Taichung has been reduced to a storage place for firewood and a homemade ladder. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

These figures, made from joined pieces of wood, were exhibited near the town of Shenghsing.

 

 

Musicians. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Spiderman. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2009
Gigantic bee. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Water buffalo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In Taiwan, electricity meter boxes are often decorated with paintings, most of which are rather kitschy.

 

 

Taiwan 2015
This painting in Taichung depicts coconut palms, which must be an unknown hybrid, as the nuts are clustered on the trunk, and not, as is usually the case, just below the fronds. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2016a
Another painting from Taichung, depicting a perfectly shaped mountain, with a gorgeous tree in front of it. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2017b
This picture shows meter boxes in the city of Huwei, Yunlin Province, adorned with tigers, painted by children. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

This painting in Taichung, one of the more perfect of its kind, depicts a fox, hunting a mouse. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2016
A perfect, cone-shaped volcano and a fancy flower park, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

The sculpture in the picture below, exhibited outside an elementary school in Taichung, depicts a cat with a Taiwan barbet (Psilopogon nuchalis) on its head. This bird is described on the page Animals – Birds: Birds in Taiwan.

 

 

Taiwan 2016a
(Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This sculpture, exhibited in the town of Xingang, is made from old cameras. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Three examples of kindergarten children’s artwork, Taichung.

 

 

Taiwan 2018c
Smiling cat, wearing a cap. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018c
Chicken. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018c
Kingfisher. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2014b
Decorated wall, Wushe Fishing Harbour. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2017b
Taiwan 2017b
From a distance, this painting in Sanyi gives the impression of being a huge wall painting, but on closer inspection it turns out to be a decorated staircase. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Painting in an underground walkway, depicting a clown and a monkey, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

In a suburban area in Taichung, a retired soldier has adorned an entire neighbourhood – walls, streets, doors – with colourful paintings. For this reason, the area has been dubbed Tsai Hung Tsun (‘Rainbow Village’).

 

 

The artist in front of one of his paintings. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
Taiwan 2013
(Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Water buffalo. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Astronaut (?). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Dressed up for a carnival (?). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Monkey. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2008
Artsy food: Dog made from sticky rice, Puli. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Wall painting, depicting a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), resting on a bench, Sanyi. The panda is described on the page Sleep. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This tiny garden has been established around a tree at the edge of a street, Taichung. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Taiwan 2017a
Drawing on a road, depicting a dolphin, Bagua Shan, near Changhua. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This mosaic on a wall in Yuantan Natural Ecological Park consists of broken pieces of tiles, depicting fireflies, crabs, and other creatures. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

This roller shutter in a kindergarten in Taichung is decorated with a painting of Snow White and the seven dwarves. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

(Uploaded February 2018)

 

(Latest update February 2021)