Decay

 

 

Dilapidated barns are often very fascinating and extremely photogenic. Four examples are shown below.

 

USA 2012
Washington, New Jersey, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Sjælland 2012-16
Stevns, Zealand, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Californien 2011a
Salt Point State Park, California. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Sverige 2015
Norra Bäck, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Jylland 2017-18
These old tools have been placed as decoration on the wall of a dilapidated shed, central Jutland, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Alperne 2018
Over the years, this spruce tree near the village of Prtovc, Triglavski National Park, Slovenia, has grown larger, and as the markings, which denote a hiking trail, have become blurred, new ones have been added. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

To me, throwing garbage at random is a clear sign of spiritual decay, but, unfortunately, a phenomenon, which is only too common around the world.

 

Bali 2015
In the town of Kintamani, Bali, Indonesia, garbage is ubiquitous. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Alperne 2018a
Some people seem unable to overcome the difficult task of throwing their garbage in this container outside Hamburg Railway Station, Germany. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

In Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, the ruling upper class shows an appalling lack of initiative, except when the object is to fill their own pockets. Renovation is largely non-existing, and lots of garbage is left in the streets, or thrown into the rivers, where the monsoon rain (when it arrives) will wash the garbage down to the Indians on the Gangetic Plain. Meanwhile, the garbage is piling up in the river beds.

 

Nepal 1994
These poor children are searching for items, which they can sell, in a huge pile of garbage along the shores of the Vishnumati River, Kathmandu. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

During the heydays of the Soviet Union, the town of Anadyr, Chukotka Province, Siberia, was of huge importance due to the presence of a gigantic missile launch, in which several missiles, armed with nuclear weapons, were aimed at various targets in the U.S. Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the whole business was covered with soil, and the importance of Anadyr vanished.

Today, this area bears the marks of decay and indifference, in equal measures. Rubble, wires, iron pipes, oil drums, scrapped trucks, workmen’s huts, and a lot of other rubbish is ubiquitous, and nobody cares to clean up the mess. During the Soviet Era, you just did what you were told, which does not exactly encourage personal initiative. Today, when you are not told to do anything, it seems that nobody wants to take the trouble to clear the mess, and thus beautify the area.

More pictures from Chukotka are found further down on this page, and you may read about flora and fauna of the area elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes: Siberia 2011 – Caterpillar trip across Chukotka.

 

Chukotka 2011
A pile of garbage in front of an abandoned factory building in Anadyr – one of these huge concrete buildings, devoid of charm, which the former Soviet government was so fond of building. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Naturally, animals do not regard garbage as unaesthetic, and you often encounter various animal species, searching for edibles in garbage heaps.

 

Varanasi 2008
Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), feeding among discarded malla garlands and other rubbish, which was presented as offerings by Hindu pilgrims to the Ganges River, Varanasi, India, and has now been moved from the river itself to its shore. – Read more about the Ganges River, and about Hinduism in general, elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Hinduism. About rhesus monkeys, see Animals: Monkeys and apes. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Sydindien 2000-01
Male Nilgiri blackbird (Turdus simillimus), feeding in a heap of garbage on Dodabetta, at 2,637 metres the highest point in the Nilgiri Mountains, Tamil Nadu, South India. This mountain is also a popular picnic spot, which is obvious from the huge amounts of garbage, which has been left here. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

In former days, on the Chukotka Peninsula, eastern Siberia, a lively town existed on the sandspit Kosa Nikolaya, clustered around a harbour, from which supplies were brought to a huge gold diggers’ camp in the nearby Zolotoi Khrebet (’Golden Ridge’) Mountains. Today, the buildings on the sandspit are empty and deserted, some of the huge oil tanks are slanting a bit, while rusted machines, trucks, wires, and a collection of other items, are scattered all over the landscape. – You may read about flora and fauna on the Chukotka Peninsula elsewhere on this website, see Travel episodes – Siberia 2011: Caterpillar trip across Chukotka.

 

Chukotka 2011a
Huge oil tanks, slanting a bit. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chukotka 2011a
Beams and tall container. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chukotka 2011a
Rusted truck. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chukotka 2011a
Broken belt on a caterpillar. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chukotka 2011a
Rusted window frame in a building. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Dead tree with dead climber, Taiwan. In the background winter foliage of a Chinese tallow-tree (Triadica sebifera). – Read more about this tree elsewhere on this website, see: In praise of the colour red. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013b
Acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus), sitting on a dilapidated windmill, formerly used to pump up drinking water for cattle, Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, Santa Ana Mountains, California. – Read more about this species elsewhere on this website, see Nature: Nature’s patterns. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali 2009
Over the years, this weather-beaten sculpture in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia, depicting the Hindu god Shiva and his mount, the bull Nandi, has been almost covered in lichens and green algae. – Read more about Hindu gods, and about Hinduism in general, elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Hinduism. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tyrkiet 2018
Abandoned house, Sultanahmet, Istanbul, Turkey. An elm-leaved sumac (Rhus coriaria) has taken root on the wall. This species is native to southern Europe and Turkey. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Mount St. Helens, an active volcano in Washington State, western United States, exploded in 1980, blowing away one side of the mountain. The eruption destroyed vast areas of the surrounding landscape, killing millions of trees. The authorities decided to protect the area, and the logs were not allowed to be removed.

 

USA-Canada 1992
This picture, which was taken in 1992, 12 years after the eruption, shows Lake Spirit, beneath the volcano, with thousands of floating logs. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

USA-Canada 1992
Several people also perished during the eruption, among these probably the owner of this car. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bornholm 2016a
Well-used letterbox in the town of Gudhjem, Bornholm, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Presumably, this Chinese jar once adorned a home in Taichung, Taiwan. Later, it was degraded to become a flower pot, but was then thrown into the street, where it has now broken. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Asien 1972-73
This old bridge in north-western Iran, made of bricks, has collapsed. – More photos of bridges are found elsewhere on this website, see Culture: Bridges. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Vorsø 1975-87
Vorsø 2000-15
Decaying process of a sign, announcing that admittance to Nature Reserve Vorsø, Horsens Fjord, Denmark, is not permitted. This sign, which was made in the 1940s, is photographed in 1978 (above) and 2014. – Read more about this nature reserve elsewhere on this website, see: Vorsø on my mind. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2
Bench on a forest trail, overgrown by mosses and epiphytes, Santa Elena Cloud Forest, Cordillera de Tilarán, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1977-90
Jylland 1977-90
These two pictures show the decaying process in two dead European hares (Lepus europaeus), which succumbed to a contagious disease. A period of three weeks has elapsed between the two pictures. – Ringkøbing Fjord, Denmark. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The Hindu Khmer Empire (c. 800-1430 A.D.), which ruled in most of Southeast Asia and parts of southern China, left a superb legacy in the form of the Angkor Wat ruins, situated in present-day Cambodia. In the 19th century, when European travelers visited the ruins, most of them were overgrown by rainforest. Since then, most of the vegetation has been removed, and many of the ruins have been restored. In many places, however, various signs of decay are still seen, as shown in the following 7 pictures.

 

Cambodia 2009
Cambodia 2009
Ta Prohm is one of the few complexes in the Angkor area, which has been preserved in the state it was found. These pictures show ruins in Ta Prohm, overgrown by huge rainforest trees, Tetrameles nudiflora (top), and Ficus gibbosa, a strangler fig (bottom). (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Cambodia 2009
This ruin in Ta Prohm with lichen-encrusted sculptures, depicting Khmer nobility, is illuminated by the late afternoon sun. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Cambodia 2009
This sculpture in Ta Prohm depicts an apsara – a female court dancer and prostitute, also called ‘heavenly nymph’ or ‘daughter of joy’. Over the years, the sculpture has been almost completely embraced by a strangler fig. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Cambodia 2010
Lichen-encrusted frieze, depicting carved faces, Angkor Thom. Water is trickling down one of the faces, making it darker, and overgrown by mosses and lichens. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Cambodia 2010
Relief in Angkor Thom, depicting a seated Hindu god. The image is blurred by seeping water, which causes an exuberant growth of green algae. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Cambodia 2010
All that remains of this sculpture in Phnom Krom, depicting a woman, is her beautiful face. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Sjælland 2006-11 
Withering leaf of water dock (Rumex hydrolapathum), displaying gorgeous colours. – Zealand, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b
Twisted railroad tracks, overgrown by mosses, Jiancing Historic Trail, Taipingshan National Forest Recreation Area, eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2011 
Charred remains of a giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum), which succumbed to a forest fire, Sequoia National Park, Sierra Nevada, California. – More photos of these remarkable trees are found elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Ancient and huge trees. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Alperne 2017
Detail of an abandoned building, Thun, Switzerland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

For me, dilapidated graves have a certain attraction, as I often find them decorative and photogenic. Below, a number of examples are shown. – Other pictures of graves are found elsewhere on this website, see Culture: Graves.

 

Sydindien 1997-98
This old cemetery from the Dutch colonial period, in the city of Kochi, Kerala, South India, has become completely overgrown by a vine, corallita (Antigonon leptopus), of the smartweed family (Polygonaceae). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Chile 2011
Chile 2011
Pueblo Pampa Union is a deserted mining town north of Carmen Alto, Chile. These pictures are from its cemetery, the lower one showing a grave, which has been opened, possibly by grave robbers. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

In Taiwan, on the so-called Tomb Sweeping Day, grasses and other wild plants, which have invaded Daoist graves, are burned by relatives, who then clean the grave and worship their ancestors.

 

Taiwan 2016
Taiwan 2014a
When a Daoist tomb in Taiwan is no longer used, relatives often smash the grave and split the tombstone. These pictures show two abandoned graves near Taichung. Fire from burning grass on nearby graves has spread to the grave in the lower picture. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Taiwan 2018a
Taiwan 2018a
These two pictures show an abandoned Daoist grave in Taichung. Next to the broken jar, a golden-rain tree (Koelreuteria elegans), of the family Sapindaceae, has sprouted. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Taiwan 2018
This lion sculpture, which was once guarding a Daoist tomb in Taichung, Taiwan, has now fallen into decay, but has nevertheless been adorned with ribbons. – Read about Daoism elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Daoism in Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Myanmar 2007
Detail of a large temple bell, coated with verdigris, outside the Buddhist Lawkananda Pagoda, Bagan, Myanmar. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Taiwan 2018c
Materials at hand were used, when these party walls in the city of Taichung, Taiwan, were repaired. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In the late 1930s, Åke Danielsson settled near Kyrkö Mosse, west of the village of Ryd, Småland, Sweden. Initially, he made a living by cutting turf, but in the long run, he didn’t make enough money out of this, so he decided to sell spare parts from junk cars instead. His junk yard was situated near a road between Ryd and the town of Hässleholm, but in the 1960s, a new highway was built away from his yard, and his customers dwindled to almost none.

However, the remaining junk cars were left at the roadside, and over the years the site fell into decay. Today, a pine forest has sprung up around the former junk yard, and here you may experience the strange sight of c. 150 rusted car wrecks, mainly from the 1940s and 1950s, which are slowly deteriorating and disappearing into the mossy and boggy forest floor. Besides the cars you may also see a bus, bicycles, mopeds, iron stoves, and car wheels, through which pine trees and other plants are growing.

Below, a number of pictures from this fascinating place are shown. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18
Sverige 2016-18

 

 

In Tibetan Buddhism, chortens are a local variety of stupas. Various parts of this structure symbolize the elements, the base representing soil, the dome water, the rings or squares above the dome fire, the half-moon air, and the uppermost point – sometimes a small sun – space. Two examples of these shrines are shown below. – Read more about chortens, and about Tibetan Buddhism in general, elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Buddhism.

 

Nordindien 1982
Weather-worn chortens, Leh, Ladakh, north-western India. These shrines are ubiquitous in Ladakh. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2002
These old chortens in Helambu, central Nepal are covered in fallen needles from long-leaved pines (Pinus roxburghii). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2012
Abandoned building, overgrown by climbers, Berlin, Maryland, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bornholm 2008b 
Decayed wheel of Kuremøllen, a Dutch type windmill near Svaneke, Bornholm, Denmark. This mill was built in 1861 to grind wheat and other crops, and a bakery was opened at the mill in 1912. The mill was closed in 1960, the bakery in 1976. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Ladakh 2000
Clouds and ruined fort at dusk, Markha Valley, Ladakh, India. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Of the 23 species of viper’s bugloss (Echium), of the forget-me-not family (Boraginaceae), which are found in the Canary Islands, the red, or Teide bugloss (E. wildprettii) only grows at high altitudes on the islands Tenerife and La Palma.

 

Kanariske Øer 2006 
Withered flower-stalk of Teide bugloss (Echium wildprettii), Teide Volcano, Tenerife, Canary Islands. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 2006-11
Sjælland 2012-16
Formerly, lime was produced at the Boesdal Kalkbrud, near Rødvig, Zealand, Denmark. These pictures show a ruined oven (top) and the roof construction in one of the production buildings. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Nepal 2013
Nepalese porter, crossing a dilapidated suspension bridge across the Ghunsa River, eastern Nepal. – More photos of bridges are found elsewhere on this website, see Culture: Bridges. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The huge Jiji earthquake, which occurred in Nantou County, Taiwan, on September 21st, 1999, was the second-deadliest in recorded history in the country, killing 2,415 people and injuring about 11,300. The damage done was estimated at ten billion US$.

 

Taiwan 2003-05 
These railroad tracks were bent during the huge Jiji earthquake, which occurred in Nantou County, Taiwan, on September 21st, 1999. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Dilapidated doors are often very fascinating and extremely photogenic. Six examples are shown below. – More pictures of doors are found elsewhere on this website, see Culture: Entrances.

 

Guatemala 1998
Guatemala 1998
Doors in abandoned houses, Antigua, Guatemala, with climbing vines and peeling paint. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

USA 2016
Dilapidated door, Haverhill, Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Sjælland 2012-16
Door in an abandoned farmhouse, with handle, chains, and a rusted bicycle lock, Zealand, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Taiwan 2016a
This door in Taichung, Taiwan, is no longer in use. In front of it, various weeds are growing up, among these a species of dayflower (Commelina) and a species of amaranth (Amaranthus). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Vorsø 2000-15
Peeling paint on a door, Vorsø, Horsens Fjord, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

 

Sri Lanka 1974-75 
Cows, grazing peacefully among tilting stone pillars of the Brazen Palace, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, built during the reign of King Parakramabahu in the 12th Century. This palace once had a bronze roof – hence its name. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Irland 1987-99
Dilapidated storage buildings and scrapped cars, Dublin, Ireland. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018b
Rusted machinery, Taichung, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2016 
Decaying panelling on an old farm shed, Maudsley State Park, Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2015
Decayed boat, Tobisviken, near Simrishamn, Skåne, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Cleared areas in the Himalaya, which lie fallow, are often invaded by large growths of a huge species of fern, Diplopterygium giganteum (formerly Gleichenia gigantea), which belongs to the family Gleicheniaceae, a group often called forked ferns. This species is distributed from Nepal eastwards to China and Southeast Asia.

 

Nepal 2008 
Withering leaf of Diplopterygium giganteum, Gul Bhanjyang, Helambu, Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Jylland 1977-90
Dilapidated half-timber farmhouse, with numerous holes in its straw roof, Jutland, Denmark. When I returned to this site about a year later to check up on its decay, the building had been torn down. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Formerly, Kolmanskuppe, near Lüderitz, Namibia, was a wealthy town in a diamond mining area. Later, it was abandoned and is today a ghost town, whose houses have been invaded by desert sand. – Read more about Kolmanskuppe, and about Namibia in general, elsewhere on this website, see Countries and places: Namibia – a desert country.

 

Sydafrika-Namibia 1993
Sydafrika-Namibia 1993
Sydafrika-Namibia 1993
Abandoned houses in Kolmanskuppe, invaded by desert sand. (Photos copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b 
Rusted – but still functional – fishing vessel, Wushe Fishing Harbour, eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2015
Ruins of a former alum factory, Degerhamn, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013a 
Peeling paint on the wall of an abandoned farmhouse, Mohave National Preserve, California, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 1969-2005 
Mountain of scrapped cars, Copenhagen, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sjælland 2012-16 
Abandoned farmhouse and tractor, Stevns, Zealand, Denmark. When I returned to this site about a year later to check up on its decay, the building had been torn down. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Old-man’s-beard lichens, of the genus Usnea, are ubiquitous in wetter areas of the Himalaya, often draping trees, hanging down from the branches and waving in the wind. – Read a fascinating account on these lichens elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Mountain plants – Plants of the Himalaya.

 

Nepal 1994-95
The outline of this dead tree in eastern Nepal, draped by old man’s beard lichens (Usnea), is blurred by fog. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The ruined Sankta Brita’s Kapell (‘Saint Birgitta’s Chapel’), situated at the coast on Kapelludden, Öland, Sweden, is 27 metres long and 12 metres wide. According to legend, the deceased Birgitta Birgersdotter (known as ‘Holy Birgitta’) was brought back from Rome in 1374 and landed at this place. Another legend has it that the chapel is dedicated to a Celtic female saint, Brigida. – Read more about Christianity elsewhere on this website, see Religion: Christianity.

 

Sverige 2015
Sankta Brita’s Kapell (‘Saint Birgitta’s Chapel’), Kapelludden, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

One day, towards the end of April 1992, I was on a mountain peak in Inyo National Forest, White Mountains, California. In front of me were the most remarkable trees I had ever seen. At a distance, they appeared completely dead, with twisted, naked branches, stretching from a yellowish trunk towards the blue sky. But then – at close quarters I noticed a narrow strip of bark on that side of the trunk, which pointed away from the direction of the prevailing wind. This strip of bark was leading up to one or two branches, densely covered in green needles, and from the tip of these branches small cones were hanging, their scales equipped with bristle-like appendages. These peculiar trees were Great Basin bristlecone pines (Pinus longaeva). Apart from certain clones, these trees are the oldest living organisms on Earth, a few of them almost 5,000 years. – More photos of these peculiar pines are found elsewhere on this website, see Plants: Ancient and huge trees.

 

Californien 2011 
Ancient Great Basin bristlecone pines (Pinus longaeva), Inyo National Forest, White Mountains, California. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Kyaukpyugyi Paya is a partly ruined Buddhist temple in the town of Nyaung Shwe, near Lake Inle, Myanmar. Only the Buddha statue, which is app. 700 years old, is maintained with fresh paint. – Read more about Buddhism on this website, see Religion: Buddhism.

 

Myanmar 2007 
Kyaukpyugyi Paya, Nyaung Shwe, Lake Inle, Myanmar. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2015 
Rusted winch in an abandoned fishing village, formerly utilized for hauling boats ashore, Alvedsjö Bodar, Öland, Sweden. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Former dovecot with spikes, the purpose of which was to prevent raptors from landing on the roof, Taichung, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

In November 1618, the Danish King Christian IV ordered admiral Ove Giedde to sail to India with five ships. The aim of this journey was to establish a trading station under the Royal Danish East India Company, to be able to supply the Motherland with cheap spices and textiles. Two years later, Giedde and his crew reached the Coromandel Coast, at the mouth of River Kaveri in present-day Tamil Nadu, South India.

Following negotiations with the Prince of Thanjavur, Giedde obtained permission to build a trading station, which was called Trankebar (in English Tranquebar) – a corruption of the local Tamil name of the place, Tarangambadi, which means ‘singing waves’. In 1660, a fort was completed, named Dansborg (’Danish Castle’). Behind this fort, a town sprang up, fortified with moats and walls, through which a number of gates gave access to the town.

 

Sydindien 2000-01 
The most striking of the city gates in Tranquebar was Landporten (‘The Land Gate’), here photographed in 2000. It has since been restored. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b
Withered leaf, partly eaten by insects, near Lisong Hot Springs, Wulu, eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Below, three examples of ‘long-term-parked’ cars are shown.

 

Zambia 1993
Samfya, northern Zambia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Taiwan 2013
Grass is growing out of an opening on this car, where a rear light glass is missing, Taichung, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

Tibet 2004
Quite an alternative way of parking, Kodari, central Nepal. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

 

Sydindien 2008
Rusted sign on a pole in Mukkali, Kerala, South India, warning against high voltage, with text in English and in the local language, Malayalam. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Afrika 1980-81 
This boy has climbed to the top of a dead date palm (Phoenix dactylifera), Tamanrasset, Algeria. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Wupatki Pueblo is a national monument in Arizona, United States, a large complex of ruins with more than a hundred rooms and a ball court. Wupatki, which means ‘tall house’ in the Hopi language, was first inhabited around 500 A.D., and, over the years, it was occupied by Cohonina, Kayenta Anasazi, and Sinagua peoples. Around 1225, the site was permanently abandoned.

 

Arizona-Utah 2001
Ruin in Wupatki Pueblo, Arizona. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sverige 2015
This abandoned building on the island of Öland, Sweden, has been overgrown by ivy (Hedera helix). (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tyrkiet 2018
Early morning light on the façade of a dilapidated hotel, Sultanahmet, Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

USA 2016 
Withered foliage of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), Winnikenni Park, Haverhill, Massachusetts, United States. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018a
The trunk of this blackboard tree (Alstonia scholaris) is partly decayed, but the tree is still alive. This species, which belongs to the dogbane family (Apocynaceae), is very commonly planted in Taiwan, where this picture was taken. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Sydlige Afrika 1993
In Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, this carcass of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana), long dead, is covered in vulture dung. Grey crowned cranes (Balearica regulorum) and blacksmith lapwings (Vanellus armatus) are seen in the background. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Chile 2011 
Scrapped cars, left on a beach near Parque Nacional Llanos de Challe, Chile. Inhabited sheds are seen in the background. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Vorsø 1975-87 
Patterns on a decayed tree trunk, where the bark has fallen off, Horsens Fjord, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2013
Creeper, making its way over a dilapidated roof of an abandoned old-style Taiwanese house, Lugang, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tyrkiet 2006 
Weather-worn relief on a rock wall in the Hittite city of Yasilikaya, from the late Bronze Age, situated near the present town of Bogazkale (Bogazköy), Turkey. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Californien 2013b
Dilapidated house, San Diego, California. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b 
Abandoned fishing boat, in which numerous weeds have sprouted through holes in the bottom, Wushe Fishing Harbour, eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica-2
Rotting leaf of a member of the arum family (Araceae), Parque Nacional Volcán Arenal, Cordillera de Tilarán, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2018
Rusted water tower, Taichung, Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bornholm 2016 
Faded phone numbers on an abandoned excavator in a granite quarry, Bornholm, Denmark. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Undoubtedly, the best known of all cactus species is the huge saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea), which can grow to 12 metres tall. It has been used as a decorative background in countless western films, but is in fact of a rather limited distribution, growing only in the Sonoran Desert of Mexico and southern Arizona, and in a small area in adjacent California. – More pictures of this species, as well as many other cacti, are found elsewhere on this website, see Gallery: Plants – Cacti.

 

Arizona-Utah 2001 
Withered ‘skeleton’ of a saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), Lake Saguaro, east of Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Tyrkiet 2006
Tilting mosque, damaged by torrential rain, Denizkonak, northern Turkey. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Bali-Lombok 2012 
Sunlight, penetrating withered leaves of a species of breadfruit, Artocarpus elasticus, Mount Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

These eroded statues of Pharaoh Amenophis III (c. 1390-1353 B.C.), near Luxor, Egypt, are commonly called The Memnon Colossi – thus named by the Greeks, who were of the opinion that the statues depicted Memnon, called ‘Son of the Red Dawn’, who was singing for his mother Eos. Following an earthquake in 27 B.C., a crack appeared in one of the statues, and when the wind forced its way through this crack, the statue would ‘sing’. Unfortunately, in 199 A.D., Emperor Septimus Severus ordered the crack to be cemented, causing the ‘song’ to cease.

 

Egypten 1999 
‘The Memnon Colossi’ – in reality statues of Pharao Amenophis III, Luxor, Egypt. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

The singleleaf piñon (Pinus monophylla) is a smallish pine species, which is common in south-western United States and the northern part of Baja California, Mexico. It grows in montane areas, usually between 1,200 and 2,300 metres altitude.

 

Californien 2013a
Dead singleleaf piñon (Pinus monophylla), Joshua Tree National Park, California. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Taiwan 2014b 
Dilapidated house, built c. 1850, Morisaka (Lintian Shan), eastern Taiwan. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg) 

 

 

Chile 2011a 
Rusted tin sheets, covering a wall in Valparaiso, Chile. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Costa Rica
Withering leaf of bijagua, or salt leaf (Calathea lutea), Reserva Nacional Hacienda Baru, Costa Rica. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

Chukotka 2011
The cannon on this army tank blew up, causing the tank to be discarded, where the accident took place. – Chukotka Peninsula, eastern Siberia. (Photo copyright © by Kaj Halberg)

 

 

(Uploaded August 2017)

 

(Revised continuously)